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Vampire books & musings? [Aug. 25th, 2009|08:14 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel
I'm in the mood for vampire stories so I decided to write this post to hear recommendations, reviews, thoughts & other musings about the subject!

Which vampire books have you read? Which do you like the best & why? Why do you find vampires interesting in the first place? Which are your favourite supernatural/gothic horror creatures?

I guess there is a big vampire hype at the moment due to Stephenie Meyer's books and True Blood and other such modern vampire stories. I have been interested in vampires since I was quite small and saw the old Dracula films with Christopher Lee and Bela Lugosi. Somehow I never was afraid of vampires but I found them really interesting. When I was a teenager I was a huge Anne Rice fan and read all her vampire books until "Memnoch the devil" which somehow was such a disappointment for me and killed my interest in Anne Rice's books. However lately I've thought about rereading the vampire chronicles and the sequels I haven't read before. Has anyone read them recently? Do you think they would still be to my liking after all these years?

Anne Rice's vampire chroniclesCollapse )

Stephenie Meyer's Twilight sagaCollapse )


Bram Stoker's DraculaCollapse )


Marcus Sedgwick: My swordhand is singingCollapse )
Poppy Z. BriteCollapse )

Angela Sommer-Bodenburg: The Little VampireCollapse )

Let The Right One InCollapse )

Stephen King: Salem's LotCollapse )

CarmillaCollapse )

Moth DiariesCollapse )

Tanith Lee: Dark DanceCollapse )

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Oscar Wilde: De Profundis [Aug. 24th, 2009|12:46 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


I admit I'm quite fascinated by Oscar Wilde. I've read a couple of his novels and recently I saw the film Wilde with Stephen Fry & Jude Law so when I found De Profundis from the library I had to read it. I did not know what to expect but somehow it was quite meaningful to read this book right now. The book is Oscar's letter from the prison to his lover Bosie. Most of it is bitter, angry and painful things about their relationship and how Oscar feels about it and the things that led him to the prison but in the end there is some kind of peace and revelations he finds in his misery and misfortune. And all that makes it meaningful and beautiful. Wilde's pondering about art, Christ and mystic of nature. His soulful way of overcoming the bitterness. I felt it was a healing experience to read this book even if at times it was annoying and uneasy to read for the negative, haunting tone of all the things he said and felt. And definitely this book only added to my interest and fascination in Wilde. For sure he was not just a great & witty writer and an interesting dandy of his time but also a great thinker and a very soulful man.

"Do not be afraid of the past. If people tell you that it is irrevocable, do not believe them. The past, the present and the future are but one moment in the sight of God, in whose sight we should try to live. Time and space, succession and extension, are merely accidental conditions of thought. The Imagination can transcend them, and move in a free sphere of ideal existences."
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Sorcery & Cecelia or The Enchanted Chocolate Pot [Aug. 16th, 2009|06:55 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


What happens when Diana Wynne Jones meets Jane Austen? Rather brilliant thing called Sorcery & Cecelia! The book is based on ghost letters written by Patricia C. Wrede and Caroline Stevermer in character of young cousins in the early 19th century Britain (AU with a magical twist, that is!) It's funny, entertaining & magical and I recommend to all Austen, 19th century, magic & witchcraft lovers.. It also made me quite fascinated by the idea of writing ghost letters myself.. :)
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Hanif Kureishi: The Buddha of Suburbia [Aug. 10th, 2009|02:36 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


I feel confused after reading this book. I have a feeling it is a masterpiece. It was a great book and a fascinating to read even if I did not always like it. The world and people it shows seem empty and selfish, especially the main character but I think it is the whole point of the book and it is really successful in describing the hollowness of life ruled by sex, drugs & rootlessness. I have a feeling this book will follow me in my thoughts for a while which is usually a sign of a good book.

It seems like a very realistic story of a young man half Indian, half British in the 70's London. The main character seems to be very selfish and out of touch with his feelings. A young man. I hated the way sex was described in this book.. as if something without feelings, without connection. Yet I believe it was how the main character saw it. His whole view on people was kind of hurtful and arrogant and oppressing yet it was just a sign of his inner emptiness.

The most interesting thing about the book is how it gives an interesting glimpse to British culture, life of immigrants and the class differences. I would love to read a sequel (if there is one) because I would love to know what happened to Karim after all this. What kind of a man did he grow up to be. The book gives some subtle hints and hope about progress and healing but it does not give a conclusion.
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Charles De Lint: Forests of the Heart [Jul. 26th, 2009|03:35 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


I love books where this world and the world of myths, magic and dreams connect. Forests of the heart is one of such books, spellbinding, interesting and fascinating. It is a story of young people who get involved in spirit world, old myths and creatures that are spirits of places.

I can highly recommend this to any urban fantasy fans & pagan people who like to read about old spirits. The only thing I at times found a bit boring was the ramblings about music styles & bands, art and all that alternative lifestyle stuff. It's funny as I very much relate to most of those things.. i just did not quite think they brought anything to the story itself but seemed more like show off from the author. I also must admit that having so many different people in the focus of the story was a bit confusing at first and some of the main characters remained a bit distant (for example if someone asked me to describe how Ellie or Donal looks I could not tell..) but on the other hand there was things & characters I really liked.. like Bettina and los cadejos.. I guess I just did not really relate to any of the characters that much.

I had heard so much positive praising about the book that I guess I had a bit too high expectations which were not completely met. Don't take it wrong.. I really truly loved the book but there was something lacking that I would have longed for.. the same way as in Neil Gaiman's American Gods. But if you loved American gods I'm sure you'll love this one too. I guess it was the character to relate to in a deeper level.

Anyway. It is a really good book! :)
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Tom Crockett: Stone age Wisdom: The healing principles of shamanism [Jul. 2nd, 2009|05:00 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


An interesting book on shamanism. It is a rather basic book but with inspiring & profound attitude and interesting influences from Peruvian shamanism.  The themes of the book are Spirit & language, balance, shaman's world, dreamworking, vision-shifting, journeying,shape-shifting, ceremony & ritual,dream-weaving & prayer. I enjoed reading this book and the reference list in the end gave me many new books to read. :)
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Silvana De Mari: The Last Elf [Jun. 19th, 2009|01:26 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


Somebody recommended this book to me years ago but only now I found it in me to read it and I really loved it to bits! It's a story of the last elf Yorshkrunsquarkljolnerstrink (or Yorsh if you prefer ;)) who learns to live in a world filled with things wonderful and cruel. The story is beautifully written, soulful and really funny in a sweet and delightful way. It is a fantasy story that might be situated in our world a long long time ago and in some elements it is very basic fantasy meant for young readers. But the main character is just so refreshingly sweet that I could not get enough of reading about him. There's a few black & white pictures here and there in the book and they bring a lovely atmosphere.

The story itself is not very original or special but the sweetness of the main charachter, the humour and the new point of view makes it quite unforgettable. Recommended to all fantasy & children book fans. :)
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historical crime [Jun. 7th, 2009|11:31 am]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

myotismond
[mood |happyhappy]

Just finished another historical crime story "A rare Interest in Murder" by Ann Granger. I already read her Markby and Mitchell-series and was delighted to see that she got into the historical crime-scheme now. I think it is a nice book, though nothing spectacular, the idea is not really new... It is situated in London 1864 and the station St. Pancras is just built. I like reading historical books about places I know. Of course it is only fiction, but nevertheless it is fun. As in most of these books of this time the female main character is a bit exeptional, a free mind not sticking to the traditional role, otherwise the whole plot would not work ;)

At the end of the book there is an ad for a book by Susanna Gregory, called "A plague on both your houses". It is situated in medieval Cambridge and I was thinking about buying it. But there is a review at Amazon that definately does not recommend it. So I wonder whether anyone of you has read it already?? Or anything else by S. Gregory? It is a complete series about Dr. Bartholomew, but there is only one in German, yet.

Anyway, I will turn to read another Inspector Jury (Martha Grimes) now. It is "Winds of Change" but I just found out that there are two more out already, so more to be read :)
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Lian Hearn: Across the Nightingale Floor [May. 20th, 2009|11:35 am]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


So many times I had looked at the book in the library because it was so beautiful and the name sounded interesting. I also have a feeling that someone has recommended it to me but I can't remember who, where or when.

It's a tale of death, revenge (war) and romance in an imaginary Japan and it is beautifully written and atmospheric yet I did not find it more than that. I don't know what I expected but I must tell the truth that most of the time I tried to hurry up reading it so I could finish it fast and read something better. I guess the main problem for me was the characters and the plot. I could not relate to them. The war, death & revenge I did not understand and the romance left me quite cold. It was not a lousy written book but for some reason it did not touch me. Many times it was pretty much like watching one of those films like Hero or Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.. beautiful in detail but empty of deeper meanings..

I do not think I will read the sequels unless someone will convince me they get much deeper and interesting..
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(no subject) [May. 13th, 2009|11:09 pm]
~*our cosy little circle of book obsessed souls*~

tindomerel


Another wonderfully entertaining urban faerie tale by Holly Black. This one goes actually in between Tithe and Ironside but it was a great read afterwards as well. Young girl Valerie Russell runs away from home after a traumatic revelation and ends up in New York with a group of bums. Faeries, trolls, enchantments... highly enjoyable! :)
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